Skip to main content

The Rule of the Road

(This essay was written by a twentieth century essayist whose name I do not know. I found it among popular essays being sent to me by a friend of mine. I thought this is so relevant for Bhutan today, especially at this point of time when people are so confused about being in democratic country. People from villages to students studying abroad seems to discuss politics at every available opportunity. But if we look at some of the discussions, we need to reflect once again whether Bhutanese have actually transcended into twenty first century. If we could ask for rights, maybe we are also obliged for some duty. So I hope this essay "The Rule of the Road" would give many Bhutanese some reflective insights.)


A stout old lady was walking with her basket down the middle of a street in Petrograd to the great confusion of the traffic and with no small peril to herself. It was pointed out to her that the pavement was the place for pedestrians, but she replied: 'I'm going to walk where I like. We've got liberty now.' It did not occur to the dear old lady that if liberty entitled the pedestrian to walk down the middle of the road, then the end of such liberty would be universal chaos. Everybody would be getting in everybody else's way and nobody would get anywhere.

Individual liberty would have become social anarchy. There is a danger of the world getting liberty-drunk in these days like the old lady with the basket, and it is just as well to remind ourselves of what the rule of the road means. It means that in order that the liberties of all may be preserved, the liberties of everybody must be curtailed. When the policeman, say, at Piccadilly Circus steps into the middle of the road and puts out his hand, he is the symbol not of tyranny, but of liberty. You may not think so. You may, being in a hurry, and seeing your car pulled up by this insolence of office, feel that your liberty has been outraged. How dare this fellow interfere with your free use of the public highway? Then, if you are a reasonable person, you will reflect that if he did not interfere with you, he would interfere with no one, and the result would be that Piccadilly Circus would be a maelstrom that you would never cross at all. You have submitted to a curtailment of private liberty in order that you may enjoy a social order which makes your liberty a reality.

Liberty is not a personal affair only, but a social contract. It is an accommodation of interests. In matters which do not touch anybody else's liberty, of course, I may be as free as I like. If I choose to go down the road in a dressing-gown whoshall say me nay? You have liberty to laugh at me, but I have liberty to be indifferent to you. And if I have a fancy for dyeing my hair, or waxing my moustache (which heaven forbid), or wearing an overcoat and sandals, or going to bed late or getting up early, I shall follow my fancy and ask no man's permission. I shall not inquire of you whether I may eat mustard with my mutton. And you will not ask me whether you may follow this religion or that, whether you may prefer Ella Wheeler Wilcox to Wordsworth, or champagne to shandy.

In all these and a thousand other details you and I please ourselves and ask no one's leave. We have a whole kingdom in which we rule alone, can do what we choose, be wise or ridiculous, harsh or easy, conventional or odd. But directly we step out of that kingdom, our personal liberty of action becomes qualified by other people's liberty. I might like to practice on the trombone from midnight till three in the morning. If I went on to the top of Everest to do it, I could please myself, but if I do it in my bedroom my family will object, and if I do it out in the streets the neighbors will remind me that my liberty to blow the trombone must not interfere with their liberty to sleep in quiet. There are a lot of people in the world, and I have to accommodate my liberty to their liberties.

We are all liable to forget this, and unfortunately we are much more conscious of the imperfections of others in this respect than of our own. A reasonable consideration for the rights or feelings of others is the foundation of social conduct.It is in the small matters of conduct, in the observance of the rule of the road, that we pass judgment upon ourselves, and declare that we are civilized or uncivilized. The great moments of heroism and sacrifice are rare. It is the little habits ofcommonplace intercourse that make up the great sum of life and sweeten or make bitter the journey.

Popular posts from this blog

Moment of Redemption

...During my university days, one of my professors told me the story of an eagle. It is said that the eagle lives for over 70 years.   But during its 40 th year, it has to make some hard decisions.   Its long and flexible talons can no longer grab its prey. Its long and sharp beak becomes bent. Its old, aged and heavy wings, due to their thick feathers, stick to its chest and make it difficult to fly. Then, the eagle is left with only two options: either to die or go through a painful process of change which lasts for over six months. The process requires that the eagle fly to a mountaintop and sit on its nest. There the eagle knocks its beak against a rock until it plucks it out. Then the eagle will wait for a new beak to grow back. Then it will pluck out its talons The talons are what an eagle uses to catch food. To pluck them out would not only be extremely difficult and painful, but would also take away their ability to provide food for themselves. When it's new

Whistleblower Policy

When one of the FCB staff told me that the management had called staff meeting asking them not to  write anything in bhutanliterature.blogspot.com, I had a mixed feeling of both sadness and happiness. I was sad because people would be left in darkness if the people no longer commented and the suppression of any unethical would be taken to new heights. The comments passed on by many staff in my blog updated staff and others across the world  about what was happening in FCB and how staff digested it. In absence of grievance redressal or whistleblower policy in FCB,  the erstwhile  FCB management was on wild elephant rampage, and as a result, the  staff had no choice but to vent their frustrations through my blog. They needed a channel to pass on the message to the management that not all things are tolerated and the world outside needed to know  that something was not going right in FCB. I think their messages, even if it was in its crudest form and language, have been delivered  and rem